Video 19 Apr 4 notes

the-three-beggars:

tierradentro:

“Christ In Limbo”, c.1655, Alonso Cano.

Follower of Bosch

Cezanne

Three depictions of Christ in Limbo.  

In the context of Christian theology, the Harrowing of Hell (Latin: Descensus Christi ad Inferos, “the descent of Christ into hell”) is the Old English and Middle English term for the triumphant descent of Christ into Hell (or Hades) between the time of his Crucifixion and his Resurrection when he brought salvation to all of the righteous who had died since the beginning of the world (excluding the damned). After his death, the soul of Jesus was supposed to have descended into the realm of the dead, which the Apostles’ Creed calls “hell” in the old English usage. In some Christian theologies, it is believed that Jesus’s soul remained united to the divinity during this time. The realm into which Jesus descended is called Sheol by some Christian theologians to distinguish it from the hell of the damned.

This nearly-extinct term in Christian theology is referenced in the Apostles’ Creed and the Athanasian Creed (Quicumque vult) which state that Jesus Christ “descended into Hell”. However, there are no explicit New Testament references to Christ having descended to the underworld (although mention is made in 1 Peter 3:19–20 of Jesus preaching to “the imprisoned spirits”). Its near-absence in Scripture has given rise to controversy and differing interpretations. It is unclear how it became part of the Apostles’ Creed.[3]

According to The Catholic Encyclopedia, the story first appears clearly in the Gospel of Nicodemus, written by a Roman praetorian named Ananias circa 425 CE, in the section called the Acts of Pilate, which also appears separately at earlier dates within the Acts of Peter and Paul[4] . The descent into hell had been related in Old English poems connected with the names of Caedmon and Cynewulf. It is subsequently repeated in Aelfric’s homilies c. 1000 CE, which is the first known inclusion of the word “harrowing”. Middle English dramatic literature contains the fullest and most dramatic development of the subject.

As an image in Christian art, the harrowing is also known as the Anastasis (a Greek word for “resurrection”), considered a creation of Byzantine culture and first appearing in the West in the early 8th century.

-Wikipedia

Photo 19 Apr 65 notes

(Source: bisexualpleasure)

via Because Bi.
Photo 19 Apr 29,044 notes chadleymacguff:

thirteenfunbreaker:

sliverdemon:

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

urbendisaster:

what?

The wheels take impact and stress off your legs, and the position helps your spine, but you’re still doing running motions instead of biking motions, so your legs are getting a good workout, and you can go for longer

Also, Superman

Kinda reminds me of that guy who made a cardboard Blue Falcon wrapped around a big tricycle.


Added bonus, you look really fucking stupid

chadleymacguff:

thirteenfunbreaker:

sliverdemon:

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

urbendisaster:

what?

The wheels take impact and stress off your legs, and the position helps your spine, but you’re still doing running motions instead of biking motions, so your legs are getting a good workout, and you can go for longer

Also, Superman

Kinda reminds me of that guy who made a cardboard Blue Falcon wrapped around a big tricycle.

Added bonus, you look really fucking stupid

(Source: cute-decoration)

via hot guac.
Photo 19 Apr 64,105 notes
via lioness.
Photo 19 Apr 10 notes canberrasubhub:

Another #Pegging postcard

canberrasubhub:

Another #Pegging postcard

Photo 19 Apr 4,680 notes
Photo 19 Apr 4 notes luccica:

uf1093_w by 0Encrypted0

luccica:

uf1093_w by 0Encrypted0

via luccica.
Photo 19 Apr 71 notes bisexualpleasure:

Bisexual pleasure #bisexual #bisex #bimmf

bisexualpleasure:

Bisexual pleasure #bisexual #bisex #bimmf

Photo 13 Apr 9,088 notes

(Source: magictransistor)

via Foam Born.
Photo 13 Apr 2,627 notes nevver:

  

Banksy

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